Try Crossword with a Twist from the Youngest Puzzle Designer in America

Anna Shechtman is a name that is now popular in the crossword world. She is an impressive figure on the American puzzle scene as she assists the New York Times puzzle editor Will Shortz.

Her first ever crossword

The young lady published her first crossword puzzle at the age of 19. Having honors in English major and minor in art history from New York, she started designing crosswords in high school after she got influenced by the documentary ‘WordPlay’.

With the encouragement of friends, Anna sent a crossword to Will Shortz, the New York Times crossword editor. She is the youngest cruciverbalist who got the puzzle published in the newspaper. Now 28, she is making the black and white grid a conversation starter.

The crossword woman with an impressive personality

Anna Shechtman has morbid, snarky and deadpan humor that has made her a star in the community of cruciverbalists. This amazing and youngest crossword constructor has been chosen by Will Shortz to become a part of a group of puzzle makers who dedicatedly focus on the crossword section.

Puzzles with a twist

The bold Shechtman’s puzzles have become the favorite among puzzle lovers as they are all about sharp-tongued feminism, politics and cultural zeitgeist of the day. This welcomed a whole new class of crossword enthusiasts, especially women.

Anna is aware of the fact that most individuals believe crosswords revolve around new words aimlessly. The puzzle constructor is actively trying to broaden the crossword culture reach while maintaining a sense of lightness, pleasure, and joy.

At a young age, she has marked herself as a rebel. She is openly criticizing the inherent sexism within the world of crossword. With her craft, crossword has become a mode for understanding or a drastic culture that is tapping into the resurgence of retro.

Escape into the entertainment world with puzzles

Have you ever solved the puzzles she constructs? Do try them. You will realize she is using crosswords to hug you rather than to test your worthiness. And this is what makes her crosswords so delightful and refreshingly feminist. No stodgy trivia, her clues are eyebrow-raising and limit pushing.